Oct 21, 2018  
2017-2018 Augusta University Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Augusta University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

College of Science and Mathematics


The College of Science and Mathematics, by offering a broad array of undergraduate courses and degree programs and selected graduate degrees, provides students with strong foundations in the sciences as well as preparation for careers, citizenship, and a life-long love of learning. Dedicated to excellence in teaching and advising, the College of Science and Mathematics is also committed to creating opportunities for intellectual growth, community involvement, and development of an academic community which models humane values and respects human diversity.

Members of the faculty of the College of Science and Mathematics are as follows:

Interim Dean: Sutherland, J.C.
Associate Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs: Gardiner, T.C.
Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies: Sutherland, J.C.

A list of faculty within the College of Science and Mathematics can be found at the link below.

http://www.augusta.edu/faculty/directory/search.php?college=5

 

 

No active programs available.

Department of Biological Sciences

Undergraduate Programs


Double or triple majors, or major-minor combinations, that combine Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, and/or Ecology are not permitted.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology
Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology and a Secondary Teacher Certification
Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology and an Integrated Master of Arts in Teaching

The Integrated Master of Arts in Teaching (IMAT) program is a high impact, high quality, program designed to generate student desire to attain 6-12 teacher certification and to recruit highly qualified undergraduate STEM majors for the teaching profession. Graduates will earn a Bachelor’s Degree (B.S.) in a Biology AND a Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) through a streamlined program.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Cell and Molecular Biology
Bachelor of Science with a major in Ecology
Minor in Biology

Students minoring in biology should see a biology faculty member as early in their careers as possible. Major-minor combinations that combine Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, and/or Ecology are not permitted.

Courses taken to satisfy Core Areas A through E may not be counted as coursework in the minor.

Programs

Bachelor of Science

Dual Degree

Non-degree

Department of Chemistry and Physics

Undergraduate Programs


Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry

About the Program

In contrast to the BS Chemistry program, the BA Chemistry program provides a platform to build a highly customized interdisciplinary education with an emphasis in a STEM discipline.  This degree is intended for a student who wants to couple a chemistry degree with a second major or a minor to have multiple strengths that allow optimum targeting of the emerging marketplace.   Multiple strengths within your degree may make you the best candidate for entry to a professional program such as medical school, dental school, or other health program by coupling a physical science with a second major in a biological science, social science or liberal arts.

Students complete Areas A-E for science majors.  In Area F students begin to select options to best meet their career goals.  Within the major you will have 11h of required coursework and select 4 additional upper level chemistry courses and choose an upper division laboratory experience.  Student will choose from among traditional areas (analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, physical) and specialty areas (forensic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, medicinal chemistry, water chemistry).  Students are required to complete a minor or a second major to demonstrate strong interdisciplinary preparation.

Career Information/Opportunities

All raw materials and finished products of any industry involve chemicals—whether it is traditional chemicals obtained from petroleum, biological materials from plants and animals, metals, minerals, or plastics.  Similarly, all living organisms are composed of chemical compounds.  Understanding the behavior of materials bring a powerful perspective to nearly any career. 

Often students are interested in science, recognize the value of studying chemistry, but also have other interests.  This interest may be a different science or could be in arts, music, social sciences, humanities, education, or business.  The BA Chemistry degree provides the flexibility to complete a degree that includes significant preparation in a different area of interest.  Perhaps the greatest benefit of this degree is the ability to combine a STEM degree with a non-STEM degree to create a background of high demand in the workforce.  For instance a skilled writer, graphic artist, or communications major with the science background from the chemistry degree is a good fit to bring these communication skills to a technology company, or for a rewarding career as a drug rep for a pharmaceutical company.  A chemistry degree coupled with a liberal arts major such as political science or English can pave the way to law school and a career as a patent attorney.  A major or minor in computer science with the chemistry degree would be valuable to design systems for manufacturing or R&D companies.  An entrepreneur or other business-minded individual can develop the scientific background to succeed in a technology field by coupling business courses with science courses in the BA Chemistry program.

Recommended pathways:

Pre-medical/Pre-dental or other pre-professional health program preparation:

Professional programs demand students with a strong background in the sciences, but recognize the value of the competencies developed in the liberal arts or additional coursework in the biological sciences such as through a second major in biology or cell and molecular biology.  Students interested in health care careers will likely select biochemistry , biochemistry lab, medicinal chemistry, drug design, and/or biochemistry lab as major electives that will make them the most competitive.

Typical Premedical Requirements

Course Amount Required for medical school admission Needed for MCAT preparation Contributes to BA CHEM Requirements

English/Writing composition

(ENGL 1101,1102)

2 courses Yes Yes Yes

Introductory Biology

(BIOL 1107, 1107L, 1108, 1108L)

2 lectures + 2 labs Yes Yes Yes

Principles of Chemistry

(CHEM 1211, 1211L, 1212, 1212L)

2 lectures + 2 labs Yes Yes Yes

Organic Chemistry

(CHEM 3411, 3412)

2 lectures + 2 labs Yes Yes Yes

Biochemistry

(CHEM 4551)

1 course Yes Yes Yes

Calculus

(MATH 2011, 2012)

1 - 2 courses Many schools No Yes

Intro. Statistics

(MATH 2210)

1 course Many schools Yes Yes

Intro. Sociology

(SOCI 1101)

1 course Some Schools Yes Yes

Intro. Psychology

(PSYC 1101)

1 course Some Schools Yes Yes

Biochemistry II

(CHEM 4552)

1 course Recommended Recommended Yes

Genetics

(BIOL 3200)

1 course Recommended Recommended Maybe

Cell Biology

(BIOL 3400)

1 course Recommended Recommended Maybe

Pre-pharmacy

Pharmacy schools require a significant number of chemistry courses to be eligible for admission.  While different pharmacy programs have some variation in the prerequisites, the required and recommended courses fit well within the chemistry program, allowing flexibility to take non-chemistry courses that are valuable additional preparation for pharmacy.  Pre-pharmacy students will benefit greatly from the medicinal chemistry, drug design, biochemistry, and physical chemistry courses.

Patent attorney

Pre-law preparation is available through a wide-variety of majors on campus.  Knowledge of science through the BA Chemistry degree will provide the technical knowledge to succeed in understanding scientific discoveries to be an effective patent attorney.

Technical Writing and Communication

Technical industries require employees who are both effective communicators and can understand the scientific aspects of the business.  The BA Chemistry degree can be coupled with a major or minor in, for instance, English or Communication for excellent preparation.

Business/Entrepreneurship

The skills of accounting, management, finance, and marketing can be readily applied to technical industries with an understanding of the scientific underpinning of the industry.  The BA Chemistry will provide fundamental knowledge applicable to a wide range of science-related businesses.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and a concentration in Biochemistry

About the program

The Biochemistry Concentration provides a flexible curriculum to allow students to customize their education to suit their career aspirations.  This flexibility is especially well-suited for students completing pre-medical, pre-dental, or pre-pharmacy requirements.  Students can focus on a secondary area with a minor, or customize their degree with upper-division electives in any field as well as undergraduate research.

Career Information/Opportunities

Biochemistry and biotechnology are at the cutting edge of many new advances in healthcare and science.  The Biochemistry Concentration of the BS Chemistry degree provides a broad education that includes all 5 traditional disciplines of chemistry (inorganic, organic, physical, analytical, and biochemistry) while offering the flexibility to customize the curriculum to prepare for professional programs such as medical, dental, or pharmacy.  The molecular basis of a chemistry degree establishes a firm foundation for a career in healthcare or for exploration of biological systems in graduate school or in a career.  Data from the Association of American Medical Colleges show that biochemistry and chemistry majors consistently earn among the top scores on the MCAT, only behind majors such as physics, math, and engineering.  The MCAT now includes a section on biochemistry, emphasizing the value of this discipline in medical preparation.

Chemistry is the study of matter, and an understanding of matter and materials is necessary in healthcare, manufacturing, and scientific research.  It is a fundamental area of knowledge that provides a foundation for most other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) areas.  Chemistry graduates also have skills in data gathering, data interpretation, and problem solving that translate well into desirable careers outside of science.

STEM graduates have a wide variety of career options, both in STEM areas and in non-STEM areas.  The 2012 STEM Report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce provides interesting data on the value of a STEM degree.  STEM graduates will have lifetime earning substantially greater than non-STEM graduates ($2.2 million vs. $1.7 million).  Nationally, 43% of STEM graduates work outside of a STEM area, often choosing a highly-paid non-STEM occupation, demonstrating the versatility of a STEM degree.  Meanwhile, STEM occupations such as chemistry are growing more quickly than the economy as a whole (17% vs. 10%).

The American Chemical Society 2013 Salary Survey shows that chemists have low unemployment (3.5%) compared to the overall unemployment rate (7.4% according to Bureau of Labor Statistics).  The median salary for a BS Chemist is $73,300.  Using your chemistry degree for a graduate or professional degree results in higher salaries (e.g. median for PhD chemist is $102,000).  A BS Chemistry graduate earns a 23% higher salary than the average BS degree graduate (www.salaryexplorer.com).

Skills and interests suited to a career in chemistry

Successful chemistry majors develop strong problem-solving skills, including comfort with math and working with abstract ideas.  While facts and knowledge are present, chemistry courses focus on understanding how and why nature behaves as it does, and relies little on rote memorization.  Many chemistry majors enjoy tinkering with things and find great satisfaction with the laboratory work including manipulation of materials and operating analytical instruments.  Two semesters of advanced coursework in biochemistry plus a laboratory course in biochemistry that build on principles from earlier coursework provide a very strong education in biochemistry with graduates typically being successful in graduate and professional programs.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and a concentration in Forensic Science

About the program

The Forensic Science Concentration provides a flexible curriculum to allow students to customize their education to suit the career aspirations.  This flexibility is well-suited for students completing pre-medical, pre-dental, or pre-pharmacy requirements.  Major electives provide breadth of experience through coursework in biology as well as non-science courses in judicial process or communications to complement a rigorous chemistry curriculum.  Coursework in judicial process is important for a forensic scientist, and advanced communications skills are universally valued by employers.  A minor is not required for this degree.

Career Information/Opportunities

The Forensic Science Concentration provides a rigorous education in chemistry with an emphasis on Analytical Chemistry.  Analytical chemistry determines the identity and concentration of materials.  This emphasis provides knowledge, skills, and perspectives that are well-suited to either a forensic laboratory or any of the many quality assurance labs found in a wide variety of workplace environments.  A recent survey by the American Chemical Society found that Analytical Chemists are the largest component of the chemistry workforce, recognizing that nearly every industry has a need to know and validate the composition of the materials they work with.

Chemistry is the study of matter, and an understanding of matter and materials is necessary in healthcare, manufacturing, and scientific research.  It is a fundamental area of knowledge that provides a foundation for most other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) areas.  Chemistry graduates also have skills in data gathering, data interpretation, and problem solving that translate well into desirable careers outside of science.

STEM graduates have a wide variety of career options, both in STEM areas and in non-STEM areas.  The 2012 STEM Report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce provides interesting data on the value of a STEM degree.  STEM graduates will have lifetime earning substantially greater than non-STEM graduates ($2.2 million vs. $1.7 million).  Nationally, 43% of STEM graduates work outside of a STEM area, often choosing a highly-paid non-STEM occupation, demonstrating the versatility of a STEM degree.  Meanwhile, STEM occupations such as chemistry are growing more quickly than the economy as a whole (17% vs. 10%).

The American Chemical Society 2013 Salary Survey shows that chemists have low unemployment (3.5%) compared to the overall unemployment rate (7.4% according to Bureau of Labor Statistics).  The median salary for a BS Chemist is $73,300.  Using your chemistry degree for a graduate or professional degree results in higher salaries (e.g. median for PhD chemist is $102,000).  A BS Chemistry graduate earns a 23% higher salary than the average BS degree graduate (www.salaryexplorer.com).

Skills and interests suited to a career in chemistry

Successful chemistry majors develop strong problem-solving skills, including comfort with math and working with abstract ideas.  While facts and knowledge are present, chemistry courses focus on understanding how and why nature behaves as it does, and relies little on rote memorization.  Many chemistry majors enjoy tinkering with things and find great satisfaction with the laboratory work including manipulation of materials and operating analytical instruments.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and a concentration in Medicinal Chemistry

About the program

The Medicinal Chemistry Concentration focuses the curriculum on organic and analytical areas to complement the medicinal chemistry courses.  Students will learn about drug design, mechanism of action of drugs, classes of drugs, and modern methods of synthesis.  Major elective hours allow customization of the degree and facilitate the ability to satisfy prerequisite courses for pre-medical, pre-dental, or pre-pharmacy preparation.  Participation in undergraduate research may be completed for credit towards major electives and is highly recommended.

Career Information/Opportunities

Healthcare related professions are the fastest growing sector of the economy and are among the highest paying jobs.  Medicinal chemistry is on the front lines of healthcare as the discipline responsible for the creation of new drugs, with medicinal chemists as the third most abundant chemistry occupation behind analytical and organic chemists according to a recent American Chemical Society survey.  The Medicinal Chemistry concentration provides a focus on the design, synthesis, and mechanism of action of drugs as part of an overall broad-based chemical education that emphasizes organic and analytical areas to complement the specific medicinal chemistry coursework.  This understanding will be valuable to students interested in the pharmaceutical industry, a career as a drug rep, or as preparation for a healthcare profession such as medicine, dentistry, or pharmacy.

Chemistry is the study of matter, and an understanding of matter and materials is necessary in healthcare, manufacturing, and scientific research.  It is a fundamental area of knowledge that provides a foundation for most other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) areas.  Chemistry graduates also have skills in data gathering, data interpretation, and problem solving that translate well into desirable careers outside of science.

STEM graduates have a wide variety of career options, both in STEM areas and in non-STEM areas.  The 2012 STEM Report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce provides interesting data on the value of a STEM degree.  STEM graduates will have lifetime earning substantially greater than non-STEM graduates ($2.2 million vs. $1.7 million).  Nationally, 43% of STEM graduates work outside of a STEM area, often choosing a highly-paid non-STEM occupation, demonstrating the versatility of a STEM degree.  Meanwhile, STEM occupations such as chemistry are growing more quickly than the economy as a whole (17% vs. 10%).

The American Chemical Society 2013 Salary Survey shows that chemists have low unemployment (3.5%) compared to the overall unemployment rate (7.4% according to Bureau of Labor Statistics).  The median salary for a BS Chemist is $73,300.  Using your chemistry degree for a graduate or professional degree results in higher salaries (e.g. median for PhD chemist is $102,000).  While the average BS Chemistry graduate earns a 23% higher salary than the average BS degree graduate, a medicinal scientist earns an average 48% higher salary than the average BS chemist (www.salaryexplorer.com).

Skills and interests suited to a career in chemistry

Successful chemistry majors develop strong problem-solving skills, including comfort with math and working with abstract ideas.  While facts and knowledge are present, chemistry courses focus on understanding how and why nature behaves as it does, and relies little on rote memorization.  Many chemistry majors enjoy tinkering with things and find great satisfaction with the laboratory work including manipulation of materials and operating analytical instruments.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and a concentration in Nuclear Science

About the program

The Nuclear Science Concentration provides a flexible curriculum to allow students to customize their education to suit their career aspirations.  This flexibility is well-suited for students completing pre-medical, pre-dental, or pre-pharmacy requirements.  Background in nuclear science is applicable to radiology, radiopharmaceuticals, and medical diagnostics with radioactive tracers that can give students interested in these fields a competitive edge in their careers.  Major electives allow students to include undergraduate research or explore other course areas such as medicinal or forensic chemistry.  A minor is not required for this degree.

Career Information/Opportunities

Nuclear Science is a prominent and expanding field, especially in the state and region.  The proximity of the Savannah River Site, the development of the MOX facility, the expansion of the Plant Vogtle facility, and the importance of radionuclides in medicine and pharmacy each represent some of the rewarding and varied career opportunities for graduates with nuclear science experience.  Nuclear science 4-year degree programs are not common, and graduates will have knowledge and skills to set them apart from others.   Students should be aware that nuclear facility workers must adhere to strict regulations including zero-tolerance for any sort of substance abuse, monitored by regular drug testing.

Chemistry is the study of matter, and an understanding of matter and materials is necessary in healthcare, manufacturing, and scientific research.  It is a fundamental area of knowledge that provides a foundation for most other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) areas.  Chemistry graduates also have skills in data gathering, data interpretation, and problem solving that translate well into desirable careers outside of science. The Nuclear Science Concentration of the BS Chemistry degree provides a broad education in chemistry that includes 3 specialized nuclear science courses including an intro course in fall plus an applications course and measurements lab in the spring.

STEM graduates have a wide variety of career options, both in STEM areas and in non-STEM areas.  The 2012 STEM Report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce provides interesting data on the value of a STEM degree.  STEM graduates will have lifetime earning substantially greater than non-STEM graduates ($2.2 million vs. $1.7 million).  Nationally, 43% of STEM graduates work outside of a STEM area, often choosing a highly-paid non-STEM occupation, demonstrating the versatility of a STEM degree.  Meanwhile, STEM occupations such as chemistry are growing more quickly than the economy as a whole (17% vs. 10%).

The American Chemical Society 2013 Salary Survey shows that chemists have low unemployment (3.5%) compared to the overall unemployment rate (7.4% according to Bureau of Labor Statistics).  The median salary for a BS Chemist is $73,300.  Using your chemistry degree for a graduate or professional degree results in higher salaries (e.g. median for PhD chemist is $102,000).  A BS Chemistry graduate earns a 23% higher salary than the average BS degree graduate (www.salaryexplorer.com).

Skills and interests suited to a career in chemistry

Successful chemistry majors develop strong problem-solving skills, including comfort with math and working with abstract ideas.  While facts and knowledge are present, chemistry courses focus on understanding how and why nature behaves as it does, and relies little on rote memorization.  Many chemistry majors enjoy tinkering with things and find great satisfaction with the laboratory work including manipulation of materials and operating analytical instruments.  In the nuclear science laboratory, students will gain hands-on experience with a variety of radiation detectors and electronics supporting them.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and a concentration in Professional Chemistry

About the program

The Professional Concentration ensures that students have experience in all 5 traditional areas of chemistry- inorganic, organic, physical, analytical, and biochemistry.  Major electives allow students to include undergraduate research or explore other course areas such as medicinal, forensic, or nuclear chemistry.  A minor is not required for this degree.

Career Information/Opportunities

The Professional Concentration of the BS Chemistry degree is based on the ACS Certified Program guidelines and provides the most comprehensive preparation in chemistry among all of the tracks and is excellent preparation for a job as a chemist, entry into a chemistry graduate program, or entry into a professional program such as medical, dental, or pharmacy school.  In addition to the most comprehensive array of chemistry coursework, graduates will have completed a significant number of mathematics courses, leading to high value in the workplace.  Graduates have traditionally shown that they are highly prepared for and successful in graduate programs, medical school, or dental school.

Chemistry is the study of matter, and an understanding of matter and materials is necessary in healthcare, manufacturing, and scientific research.  It is a fundamental area of knowledge that provides a foundation for most other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) areas.  Chemistry graduates also have skills in data gathering, data interpretation, and problem solving that translate well into desirable careers outside of science.

STEM graduates have a wide variety of career options, both in STEM areas and in non-STEM areas.  The 2012 STEM Report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce provides interesting data on the value of a STEM degree.  STEM graduates will have lifetime earning substantially greater than non-STEM graduates ($2.2 million vs. $1.7 million).  Nationally, 43% of STEM graduates work outside of a STEM area, often choosing a highly-paid non-STEM occupation, demonstrating the versatility of a STEM degree.  Meanwhile, STEM occupations such as chemistry are growing more quickly than the economy as a whole (17% vs. 10%).

The American Chemical Society 2013 Salary Survey shows that chemists have low unemployment (3.5%) compared to the overall unemployment rate (7.4% according to Bureau of Labor Statistics).  The median salary for a BS Chemist is $73,300.  Using your chemistry degree for a graduate or professional degree results in higher salaries (e.g. median for PhD chemist is $102,000).  A BS Chemistry graduate earns a 23% higher salary than the average BS degree graduate (www.salaryexplorer.com).

Skills and interests suited to a career in chemistry

Successful chemistry majors develop strong problem-solving skills, including comfort with math and working with abstract ideas.  While facts and knowledge are present, chemistry courses focus on understanding how and why nature behaves as it does, and relies little on rote memorization.  Many chemistry majors enjoy tinkering with things and find great satisfaction with the laboratory work including manipulation of materials and operating analytical instruments.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry and an Integrated Master of Arts in Teaching

About the program

The BS Chemistry-IMAT program ensures that students have experience in all 5 traditional areas of chemistry- inorganic, organic, physical, analytical, and biochemistry.  The education courses include both undergraduate courses and graduate courses that are begun as early as the junior year.  The final semester consists of a practicum of teaching in the high school environment.

For admission to the MAT program, faculty recommendation and interview with the College of Education IMAT program director is required.

Career Information/Opportunities

The importance of science in high schools is clearer than ever as the US competes in the global technological economy and faces the challenges of developing a future STEM workforce.  The Chemistry-IMAT program is an innovative, streamlined program where students begin graduate level coursework for the Masters in Teaching while they are still completing the undergraduate requirements, resulting in both the undergraduate BS and the graduate MAT degrees completed in only 5 years with teacher certification.  Once certified in chemistry, students can become certified in other areas such as mathematics, physics, biology, or broad field science through certification testing.

Chemistry is the study of matter, and an understanding of matter and materials is necessary in healthcare, manufacturing, and scientific research.  It is a fundamental area of knowledge that provides a foundation for most other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) areas.  Chemistry graduates also have skills in data gathering, data interpretation, and problem solving that translate well into desirable careers outside of science.

STEM graduates have a wide variety of career options, both in STEM areas and in non-STEM areas.  The 2012 STEM Report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce provides interesting data on the value of a STEM degree.  STEM graduates will have lifetime earning substantially greater than non-STEM graduates ($2.2 million vs. $1.7 million).  Nationally, 43% of STEM graduates work outside of a STEM area, often choosing a highly-paid non-STEM occupation, demonstrating the versatility of a STEM degree.  Meanwhile, STEM occupations such as chemistry are growing more quickly than the economy as a whole (17% vs. 10%).

The American Chemical Society 2013 Salary Survey shows that chemists have low unemployment (3.5%) compared to the overall unemployment rate (7.4% according to Bureau of Labor Statistics).  The median salary for a BS Chemist is $73,300.  Using your chemistry degree for a graduate or professional degree results in higher salaries (e.g. median for PhD chemist is $102,000).  A BS Chemistry graduate earns a 23% higher salary than the average BS degree graduate (www.salaryexplorer.com).

Skills and interests suited to a career in chemistry

Successful chemistry majors develop strong problem-solving skills, including comfort with math and working with abstract ideas.  While facts and knowledge are present, chemistry courses focus on understanding how and why nature behaves as it does, and relies little on rote memorization.  Many chemistry majors enjoy tinkering with things and find great satisfaction with the laboratory work including manipulation of materials and operating analytical instruments.  The department offers opportunities for students to develop teaching skills as paid tutors or supplemental instruction leaders.  These experiences can assist students in determining whether they find working with others as a teacher and mentor fits their personality and provides satisfaction.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry with Secondary Teacher Certification

About the program

The BS Chemistry secondary education certification program ensures that students have experience in all 5 traditional areas of chemistry- inorganic, organic, physical, analytical, and biochemistry.  The education courses prepare students to become effective teachers.  Students interested in high school teaching should also consider the BS Chemistry IMAT program as an alternative to this program that may be a better choice for many students.

Career Information/Opportunities

The importance of science in high schools is clearer than ever as the US competes in the global technological economy and faces the challenges of developing a future STEM workforce.  The BS Chemistry with secondary education certification program is one of the two available programs intended for students who wish to become a high school chemistry teacher, the other being the BS Chemistry-IMAT program.  While both programs lead to certification, this program results in a BS degree with 136 credit hours while the IMAT results in both BS and MAT degrees in 154 credit hours.  Once certified in chemistry, students can become certified in other areas such as mathematics, physics, biology, or broad field science through certification testing.

Chemistry is the study of matter, and an understanding of matter and materials is necessary in healthcare, manufacturing, and scientific research.  It is a fundamental area of knowledge that provides a foundation for most other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) areas.  Chemistry graduates also have skills in data gathering, data interpretation, and problem solving that translate well into desirable careers outside of science.

STEM graduates have a wide variety of career options, both in STEM areas and in non-STEM areas.  The 2012 STEM Report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce provides interesting data on the value of a STEM degree.  STEM graduates will have lifetime earning substantially greater than non-STEM graduates ($2.2 million vs. $1.7 million).  Nationally, 43% of STEM graduates work outside of a STEM area, often choosing a highly-paid non-STEM occupation, demonstrating the versatility of a STEM degree.  Meanwhile, STEM occupations such as chemistry are growing more quickly than the economy as a whole (17% vs. 10%).

The American Chemical Society 2013 Salary Survey shows that chemists have low unemployment (3.5%) compared to the overall unemployment rate (7.4% according to Bureau of Labor Statistics).  The median salary for a BS Chemist is $73,300.  Using your chemistry degree for a graduate or professional degree results in higher salaries (e.g. median for PhD chemist is $102,000).  A BS Chemistry graduate earns a 23% higher salary than the average BS degree graduate (www.salaryexplorer.com).

Skills and interests suited to a career in chemistry

Successful chemistry majors develop strong problem-solving skills, including comfort with math and working with abstract ideas.  While facts and knowledge are present, chemistry courses focus on understanding how and why nature behaves as it does, and relies little on rote memorization.  Many chemistry majors enjoy tinkering with things and find great satisfaction with the laboratory work including manipulation of materials and operating analytical instruments.  The department offers opportunities for students to develop teaching skills as paid tutors or supplemental instruction leaders.  These experiences can assist students in determining whether they find working with others as a teacher and mentor fits their personality and provides satisfaction.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Physics

About the program

The BS in Physics program provides instruction in each major area of physics. Graduates are well prepared to enter graduate programs in physics, professional programs, or begin employment in any of a variety of areas. Upon completion of Calculus I, students are ready to begin the 2-semester introductory physics coursework.  The advanced physics coursework is completed in the junior and senior years.  Most of the advanced courses are currently offered only every other year, thus the juniors and seniors take the advanced courses together.  Many majors participate in undergraduate research projects and present results at professional meeting.  The physics faculty work closely with the majors to advise and mentor them through the program.

(Grade of C or better is required in all physics courses.)

Career Information/Opportunities

The BS Physics degree provides a robust, fundamental science education that can be applied effectively to nearly any career path.  Graduates have extraordinary analytical, mathematical, and problem-solving skills including the ability to think abstractly and handle complex data.  These skills that are developed by pursuing the physics degree are highly valued by employers.  Graduates frequently choose to pursue further education in graduate level physics, engineering, or professional programs such as medical school or dental school.  Physics majors are traditionally among the best prepared for professional programs as evidenced by MCAT scores higher than most other majors (second only to Economics in 2012 according to the AIP Statistical Research Center based on AAMC data).  Demonstrating the broad applicability of skills, physics majors were second only to math majors in performance on the LSAT for admission to Law School (2012 Law School Admission Council data).

Physics is the study of the behavior of the world around us.  It is the foundation of all other sciences with principles being essential to engineering, scientific research, healthcare, and manufacturing.  Physics majors frequently become highly skilled at computer programming and some find employment opportunities in IT.

 Physics graduates, like others in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) are not only in high demand by employers, but they generally command higher salaries regardless of the area of employment.  A 2005 PricewaterhouseCoopers report found physics majors earn 30% more than other BS degree majors, with salary differences becoming more pronounced later in the career.  A 2010 Institute of Physics survey found that 58% of physics graduates who were employed immediately after their BS degree worked in an occupation that was not related to physics, yet 79% of these employees reported that their physics background was useful to their job.  From 1980-2008 the number of STEM majors in managerial positions increased 73% while the overall workforce increased by only 44%.  You can usually use your physics degree to take you to a career that fits your passion.

Job satisfaction is generally quite high among physics graduates.  American Institute of Physics surveys show greater than 80% in private sector STEM have high satisfaction.  Greater than 70% in non-STEM positions report satisfaction, with the lack of intellectual challenge as the main factor lowering the rate.  Over 90% of physics graduates teaching in high schools report high job satisfaction.

Skills and interests suited to studying physics

Physics majors are generally very curious and are interested in learning how the world around them works.  Physics majors must pursue and ultimately be comfortable with high level mathematics.  In coursework, students learn to apply fundamental principles and problem-solving strategies to complex problems.  While there is fundamental factual content, there is minimal use of rote memorization in course material.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Physics and a concentration in Nuclear Science

About the program

The nuclear science concentration of the BS Physics provides students with a thorough understanding of radioactivity and radionuclides to accompany broad preparation in physics. Upon completion of Calculus I, students are ready to begin the 2-semester introductory physics coursework.  The advanced physics coursework is completed in the junior and senior years.  Most of the advanced courses are currently offered only every other year, thus the juniors and seniors take the advanced courses together.  Many majors participate in undergraduate research projects and present results at professional meeting.  The physics faculty work closely with the majors to advise and mentor them through the program.  The nuclear science concentration includes 3 specialized nuclear science courses, an intro course in fall plus an applications course and measurements lab in the spring.

Career Information/Opportunities

Nuclear Science is a prominent and expanding field, especially in the state and region.  The proximity of the Savannah River Site, the development of the MOX facility, the expansion of the Plant Vogtle facility, and the importance of radionuclides in medical physics each represent some of the various rewarding career opportunities for graduates with nuclear science experience.  Nuclear science 4-year degree programs are not common, and graduates will have knowledge and skills to set them apart from others.  Nuclear workers have a high-value skill set in an expanding field.  Students should be aware that nuclear facility workers must adhere to strict regulations such as drug testing that involve zero-tolerance for any sort of substance abuse.

The BS Physics degree overall provides a robust, fundamental science education that can be applied effectively to nearly any career path.  Graduates have extraordinary analytical, mathematical, and problem-solving skills including the ability to think abstractly and handle complex data.  These skills that are developed by pursuing the physics degree are highly valued by employers.  Graduates frequently choose to pursue further education in graduate level physics, engineering, or professional programs such as medical school or dental school.  Physics majors are traditionally among the best prepared for professional programs as evidenced by MCAT scores higher than most other majors (second only to Economics in 2012 according to the AIP Statistical Research Center based on AAMC data).  Demonstrating the broad applicability of skills, physics majors were second only to math majors in performance on the LSAT for admission to Law School (2012 Law School Admission Council data).

Physics is the study of the behavior of the world around us.  It is the foundation of all other sciences with principles being essential to engineering, scientific research, healthcare, and manufacturing.  Physics majors frequently become highly skilled at computer programming and some find employment opportunities in IT.

Physics graduates, like others in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) are not only in high demand by employers, but they generally command higher salaries regardless of the area of employment.  A 2005 PricewaterhouseCoopers report found physics majors earn 30% more than other BS degree majors, with salary differences becoming more pronounced later in the career.  A 2010 Institute of Physics survey found that 58% of physics graduates who were employed immediately after their BS degree worked in an occupation that was not related to physics, yet 79% of these employees reported that their physics background was useful to their job.  From 1980-2008 the number of STEM majors in managerial positions increased 73% while the overall workforce increased by only 44%.  You can usually use your physics degree to take you to a career that fits your passion.

Job satisfaction is generally quite high among physics graduates.  American Institute of Physics surveys show greater than 80% in private sector STEM have high satisfaction.  Greater than 70% in non-STEM positions report satisfaction, with the lack of intellectual challenge as the main factor lowering the rate.  Over 90% of physics graduates teaching in high schools report high job satisfaction.

Skills and interests suited to studying physics

Physics majors are generally very curious and are interested in learning how the world around them works.  Physics majors must pursue and ultimately be comfortable with high level mathematics.  In coursework, students learn to apply fundamental principles and problem-solving strategies to complex problems.  While there is fundamental factual content, there is minimal use of rote memorization in course material.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Physics and an Integrated Master of Arts in Teaching

About the program

Upon completion of Calculus I, students are ready to begin the 2-semester introductory physics coursework.  The advanced physics coursework is completed in the junior and senior years.  Most of the advanced courses are currently offered only every other year, thus the juniors and seniors take the advanced courses together.  Many majors participate in undergraduate research projects and present results at professional meeting.  The physics faculty work closely with the majors to advise and mentor them through the program.  The education courses include both undergraduate courses and graduate courses that are begun as early as the junior year.  The final semester consists of a practicum of teaching in the high school environment.

For admission to the MAT program, faculty recommendation and interview with the College of Education IMAT program director is required.

Career Information/Opportunities

The importance of science in high schools is clearer than ever as the US competes in the global technological economy and faces the challenges of developing a future STEM workforce.  The university enjoys a tradition of preparing students for careers teaching high school physics, a discipline for which high schools often have difficulty finding qualified teachers.  Nationally, an American Institute of Physics survey found that over 90% of physics graduates teaching in high schools report high job satisfaction.   The Physics-IMAT program is an innovative, streamlined program where students begin graduate level coursework for the Masters in Teaching while they are still completing the undergraduate requirements, resulting in both the undergraduate BS and the graduate MAT degrees completed in only 5 years with teacher certification.  Once certified in physics, students can become certified in other areas such as mathematics, biology, chemistry, or broad field science through certification testing.  Many of the graduates from this program maintain professional contacts with our department and with classmates.

The BS Physics degree overall provides a robust, fundamental science education that can be applied effectively to nearly any career path.  Graduates have extraordinary analytical, mathematical, and problem-solving skills including the ability to think abstractly and handle complex data.  These skills that are developed by pursuing the physics degree are highly valued by employers.  Graduates frequently choose to pursue further education in graduate level physics, engineering, or professional programs such as medical school or dental school.  Physics majors are traditionally among the best prepared for professional programs as evidenced by MCAT scores higher than most other majors (second only to Economics in 2012 according to the AIP Statistical Research Center based on AAMC data).  Demonstrating the broad applicability of skills, physics majors were second only to math majors in performance on the LSAT for admission to Law School (2012 Law School Admission Council data).

Physics is the study of the behavior of the world around us.  It is the foundation of all other sciences with principles being essential to engineering, scientific research, healthcare, and manufacturing.  Physics majors frequently become highly skilled at computer programming and some find employment opportunities in IT.

Physics graduates, like others in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) are not only in high demand by employers, but they generally command higher salaries regardless of the area of employment.  A 2005 PricewaterhouseCoopers report found physics majors earn 30% more than other BS degree majors, with salary differences becoming more pronounced later in the career.  A 2010 Institute of Physics survey found that 58% of physics graduates who were employed immediately after their BS degree worked in an occupation that was not related to physics, yet 79% of these employees reported that their physics background was useful to their job.  From 1980-2008 the number of STEM majors in managerial positions increased 73% while the overall workforce increased by only 44%.  You can usually use your physics degree to take you to a career that fits your passion.

Skills and interests suited to studying physics

Physics majors are generally very curious and are interested in learning how the world around them works.  Physics majors must pursue and ultimately be comfortable with high level mathematics.  In coursework, students learn to apply fundamental principles and problem-solving strategies to complex problems.  While there is fundamental factual content, there is minimal use of rote memorization in course material.  The department offers opportunities for students to develop teaching skills as paid tutors or supplemental instruction leaders.  These experiences can assist students in determining whether they find working with others as a teacher and mentor fits their personality and provides satisfaction.

Minor in Chemistry

By earning a chemistry minor, you will learn foundational chemical principles and obtain practical laboratory skills that will enhance the value of any degree.  There is also sufficient flexibility to explore a classic or specialized field of chemistry within the minor.  If you continue in chemistry, only a few classes beyond the minor are needed to earn a BA in Chemistry as a second degree.  A faculty advisor in chemistry can provide guidance for your best path.  Employees with a chemistry background are employed in a very wide array of areas (see https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/careers.html).

Minor in Physics

The analytical and problem-solving abilities gained from a study of physics are valued widely.  The American Institute of Physics provides information on the many opportunities afforded by an education in physics (https://www.aip.org/career-resources).  A minor in physics is highly customizable from selection among a broad range of courses in the physics curriculum.  A minor in physics adds employer recognized benefit to many science and non-science major degrees.  This benefit is particularly respected in fields such as education, computer science, and business.

Pre-Engineering Curriculum

Augusta University participates in the University System of Georgia Engineering Pathways program enabling our students to smoothly transfer to the engineering program in the state or complete a dual degree in physics and engineering. The Department of Chemistry and Physics and the Department of Mathematics offer many of the courses required of freshmen and sophomores to prepare students for transfer to engineering programs.  Because of the curriculum overlap with the physics programs, students will generally declare a physics major with a pre-engineering concentration while completing prerequisite coursework.  Our students are highly successful at completing programs following transfer to such institutions as Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Georgia, Georgia Southern University and Southern Polytechnic State University, as well as other programs outside the state of Georgia.  There are many diverse programs to consider such as Mechanical, Electrical or Civil engineering or programs such as BioChemical, Computer Systems, Environmental, or Biological Engineering programs.

STEM areas are in high demand for employers, and growth in many engineering disciplines is anticipated to be high.  Engineers will train to solve complex analytical problems with both computational and hands on techniques with real world applications.

The Department will work with students to help select the best path through the course work for their desired or intended program.  It is advisable for students to research the specific program of interest so that advisors can help design a custom curriculum.  In addition to your advisor in the Academic Advising Center, you should also begin consulting with a faculty advisor early in your academic career.  There is a broad diversity in specific requirements for each program. Track sheets and links to Georgia institutions can be found on the Department of Chemistry and Physics web site.

Programs

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Science

Dual Degree

Non-degree

Other Programs

Department of Mathematics

Admission Requirements for Majors

Students choosing to major in Mathematics begin as Pre-Mathematics majors. Students with an institutional GPA of at least 2.0 may declare a major in Mathematics upon completion of MATH 2012  with a grade of C or better.

Undergraduate Programs


Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics

Graduates who earn a bachelor’s degree in mathematics are logical thinkers and trained problem solvers. They have a broad background in a variety of mathematical techniques, and their program of study can emphasize either pure or applied mathematics. They often embark on careers as actuaries, systems analysists, statisticians, economists, or many other careers.  A graduate in mathematics is also well prepared to continue their education in a Masters or Ph.D. program in the mathematical sciences, medical school, law school, or other graduate programs.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics and a concentration in Biostatistics or Statistics

Graduates who earn a bachelor’s degree in mathematics with a concentration in biostatistics are logical thinkers and trained problem solvers.  They have a broad background in a variety of mathematical techniques with a focus on statistics and data science.  They embark on careers as statisticians, epidemiologists, actuaries, and many other careers.  A graduate is also well prepared to continue their education in graduate school, medical school, or other programs of study.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics and an Integrated Master of Arts in Teaching

 The Integrated Master of Arts in Teaching (IMAT) program is a high impact, high quality, program designed to generate student desire to attain 6-12 teacher certification and to recruit highly qualified undergraduate STEM majors for the teaching profession. Graduates will earn a Bachelor’s Degree (B.S.) in Mathematics AND a Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) through a streamlined program.

Bachelor of Science with a major in Mathematics with Secondary Teacher Certification

Graduates who earn a bachelor’s degree in mathematics are logical thinkers and trained problem solvers.  They have a broad background in a variety of mathematical techniques.  By earning Secondary Teacher Certification as well, they are trained in educational theory and pedagogical techniques, and are well prepared for a career as a high school mathematics teacher.

Minor in Mathematics

A minor in mathematics is a great complement to any major, particularly majors in the sciences or business.  A minor in mathematics trains students in challenging problem solving and logical thought processes, skills valuable to any employer.

 

Programs

Bachelor of Science

Dual Degree

Non-degree

Department of Military Science

Military Science Curriculum

Program Features

Admission and Incentives: A student enrolled in basic course classes incurs no obligation to the U .S. Army. Advanced course students are obligated to serve and will receive a subsistence allowance of $450/500 per month for up to 20 academic months while in college. Other training opportunities such as Air Assault, Airborne School, Arctic Warfare School, and Cadet Troop Leadership Training (CTLT) in active units are available on a competitive basis with military subsistence and some paid benefits. A student in any major/minor field of study is eligible. During the senior year of study (MS IV), the student is offered the option to select the type of job that he or she desires to perform, the first permanent duty post, and the type of commission, either Regular Army or Army Reserve, that he or she prefers. The Army at no charge provides all necessary uniforms to the individual. Academic credit, applicable toward graduation, is granted for all military science course work. Any advanced course credits earned apply within the general studies minor.

The Scholarship Program: The Army Military Science Scholarship Program awards full-time four, three, and two-year scholarships to eligible students on a competitive basis. The Department of Military Science accepts applications for two and three-year scholarships throughout the year. A student does not have to be currently enrolled in Military Science to apply for two and three-year scholarships. In addition to the National Scholarships, the Department Chair awards multiple four, three, and two-year scholarships annually to students. Each scholarship pays full tuition, books, lab fees, and other educational expenses. In addition, all Military Science scholarship students receive $300 to $500 per month for up to 10 months of each school year the scholarship is in effect. Upon Commissioning as a Second Lieutenant, most agreements call for graduates to serve three or four years of active duty, or six years in the National Guard or Army Reserves.

The Simultaneous Membership Program: The Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP) allows cadets to be enrolled in the Military Science Advanced Course and a local Army National Guard or Reserve unit at the same time. The benefits of this program are that cadets not only receive $250 per academic month from the Military Science Department but also receive drill pay from their Army National Guard or Army Reserve equivalent to an E-5 pay. Cadets in this program perform the duties of an officer trainee in their Army National Guard or Army Reserve unit. Some National Guard programs offer tuition assistance as well. This program provides valuable management experiences which will interest future employers and prepare cadets for leadership and management positions after graduation.

Minor in Military Science

The Military Science minor is primarily designed for the student planning a career in the U.S. Army as a commissioned officer. Military Science teaches skills that are vital for professional success on and off the battlefield, such as group leadership, management positions and public speaking. Leadership is the process of influencing an individual or a team of people by providing them purpose, direction, and motivation to accomplish assigned missions and to improve the team for the future. Courses should be arranged in consultation with your major department and the Professor of Military Science.

Courses taken to satisfy Core Areas A through E may not be counted as coursework in the minor.

Programs

Non-degree

Other Programs

Department of Psychological Sciences

The Department of Psychological Sciences is dedicated to the understanding of behavior and the mind.  Both the undergraduate and graduate programs provide opportunities to learn about the theoretical and empirical findings and the process by which information is obtained.  The degree programs focus on developing skill sets highly valued by employers and graduate programs: critical thinking, ethical integrity, professional development, social and cultural awareness, and communication.  These experiences happen in the classroom as well as research labs and internships.

Undergraduate Programs


 
Bachelor of Science with a major in Psychology

 

Graduate Programs


 
Master of Science with a Major in Psychology

The graduate program in psychology provides intensive master’s degree level education and training, with most students selecting an applied track which emphasizes clinical and counseling psychology. The program can also provide preparation for further graduate education or, for a limited number of students, the opportunity to pursue specific interests in experimental psychology.

The M.S. program in psychology is designed as a full-time, day-time and year-round program. Most students complete their degree requirements in two years, earning credits in advanced foundation courses (e.g., learning, social, personality, statistics), applied course work (e.g., psychometry, counseling/ therapy, psychopathology) and supervised internship experience in treatment facilities or research laboratories. The department operates a psychometric and clinical training facility, and an animal and human research laboratory. Internship opportunities are available at many local agencies including a Veterans Administration Medical Center, a regional state psychiatric hospital, the Medical College of Georgia, a regional state school and hospital for the developmentally disabled, a regional state training center for juvenile offenders, and the Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center at Fort Gordon. The clinical/counseling track is accredited by the Masters in Psychology and Counseling Accreditation Council (MPCAC).

The Department and its faculty members maintain active relationships with the discipline’s various governing and professional bodies, such as the American Psychological Association (APA), Association of Psychological Science (APS), Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology (COGDOP), Council of Applied Master’s Programs in Psychology (CAMPP), and North American Association of Master’s in Psychology (NAMP).

Admission Procedures and Requirements

Please see the Office of Academic Admissions website for specific admissions information: http://www.augusta.edu/admissions/graduate/master-psychology.php

Financial Aid and Graduate Assistantships

Students are expected to arrange their own means of paying tuition and other fees. Persons requiring financial assistance should first contact the Office of Financial Aid to inquire about funding alternatives, including the Work Study Program and low-interest loans. The department offers a limited number of graduate assistantships which reduce tuition and provide a monthly income in return for services to the university. These are assigned on a competitive basis each semester from among those students applying or recommended by the faculty. The award of an assistantship one semester is not a guarantee of future awards, and the university and department reserve the right to modify the number and conditions of awards as necessary. Graduate assistants are required to carry an academic load of at least nine semester hours.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Science in Psychology offers three tracks: The clinical/counseling track, the general experimental track and the applied experimental track. Students who seek to pursue the doctoral degree are advised to complete the general experimental track. Those individuals who wish to work in more applied settings after graduation, such as a medical research environment, technical college, or community agencies are advised to choose the applied experimental track.

General Experimental Track

The general experimental track requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 47 semester hours of graduate work including Professional Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6190) and Ethical Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6191), Research Methods I and II (PSYC 6121 and PSYC 6122), Research Methods Lab I and Research Methods Lab II (PSYC 6921 and PSYC 6922), six semester hours of Research Practicum (PSYC 6930 and PSYC 6931), and six semester hours of Thesis Research (PSYC 6990). Beyond this, an individualized plan of study, conforming to the requirements of the department and approved by the student’s Academic Advisor and the Director of the Graduate Program, is used to establish a program of study. Students will be given formal permission by the faculty to pursue a thesis or internship at the end of the spring of their first year of graduate studies. The faculty will review the student’s professional goals, academic performance and professional and ethical behavior to determine whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. For this track, at least 38 of 47 total hours required must be earned in the major field; and at least 41 of the 47 hours should be in content courses (not PSYC 6990).

Applied Experimental Track

The applied experimental track requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 48 semester hours of graduate work including Professional Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6190) and Ethical Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6191), Research Methods I and II (PSYC 6121 and PSYC 6122), Research Methods Lab I and Research Methods Lab II (PSYC 6921 and PSYC 6922), six semester hours of Research Practicum (PSYC 6930 and PSYC 6931), Cognitive Assessment (PSYC 6126 and PSYC 6926), and six semester hours of Internship (PSYC 6940, PSYC 6970 and/or PSYC 6980). Beyond this, an individualized plan of study, conforming to requirements of the department and approved by the student’s Academic Advisor and the Director of teh Graduate Program, is used to establish a program of study. Students will be given formal permission by the faculty to pursue a thesis or internship at the end of the spring semester of their first year of graduate studies. The faculty will review the student’s professional goals, academic performance, and professional and ethical behavior to determine whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. For this track, at least 38 of the 48 total hours required must be earned in the major field; For this track, at least 38 of the 47 total hours required must be earned in the major field; and at least 42 of the 48 hours should be in contact courses (not PSYC 6940, PSYC 6970, and/or PSYC 6980).

Clinical/Counseling Track

The clinical/counseling track offers a thesis or a non-thesis (internship) option. The plan of study, as approved by the student’s Academic Advisor and the Director of the Graduate Program, is used to determine whether the student will be in the thesis or internship track. The non-thesis option requires the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 53 semester hours of graduate courses as detailed below. Students who pursue the non-thesis option will need to complete at least 8 hours of PSYC 6960 Clinical Internship. All clinical/counseling students are strongly encouraged to carefully study the license requirements in the states where they may be employed in the future. For this track, at least 50 of the total hours required must be earned in the major field; and at least 45 of the 53 hours should be in content courses (not PSYC 6940, PSYC 6960 , PSYC 6970, PSYC 6980, and/or PSYC 6990).

Additional Information

The M.S. program is scheduled on a year-round basis; students attend the summer term as full-time students.

Transfer of credit from another institution is contingent upon a positive recommendation by the student’s Academic Advisor and approval by the Department Chair, and may not exceed nine semester hours. The plan of study may also not include more than nine semester hours taken in academic units other than the Department of Psychology. Only that course work completed within the six calendar years prior to completion of degree requirements will apply toward graduation.

Admission to candidacy for the Master of Science degree may occur no earlier than the completion of 15 semester hours of graduate work. To be admitted to candidacy, the student must additionally be classified as a regular graduate student, earn (and maintain) the endorsement of the graduate faculty, successfully complete Professional Issues in Psychology (PSYC 6190) (including the general psychology component), successfully complete the Research Methods sequence (PSYC 6121 and PSYC 6122), and achieve a GPA of at least 3.00 in all graduate course work.

Comprehensive written and oral examinations are an integral part of the program of study and are designed to measure the student’s knowledge of and competency in the field of psychology, to include conceptual, language, interpersonal and professional competencies commensurate with an advanced degree. The admissibility of candidates to the comprehensive examination will be based on the following criteria: possession of a currently viable admission to candidacy, a GPA of 3.0, successful completion of 33 semester hours of the plan of study, and official enrollment in the university in the semester during which the candidate will be examined.

Students are expected to maintain a GPA of at least 3.00 across all courses attempted in the M.S. degree program. Students who earn a C in two or more courses in the program of study will be dismissed. Dismissal is probable for the student who earns a C in two or more courses in the program of study. Dismissal may also occur when students display unethical and unprofessional behavior, fail to pass comprehensive exams, or when students in provisional status have deficient academic records (i.e., grades lower than a B while on provisional status). Students who are dismissed from the program must formally reapply to gain re-admittance.

Please Note: The Policy Manual for the M.S. Program in Psychology may be obtained from the department website, and should be consulted for a more thorough and sometimes more current description of the program and its regulations.

Minor in Psychology

 

Programs

Bachelor of Science

Master of Science

Non-degree